The taxman will begin to trawl the books of individual GAA clubs in the late summer or autumn. It is understood that tax officials will look at payments made to managers and coaches as part of a detailed examination into the way clubs conduct their business.
Under the GAA’s rules, the only payments team managers can receive are vouched expenses for travel and meals. It is also understood that negotiations are still continuing between Croke Park and the Revenue Commissioners over the issue of payments to referees. Officials in Tipperary were advised that new revenue guidelines will now be enforced nationally with clubs told to cease with cash payments and instead pay all bills and other expenditure by cheque.
In a Dáil reply Michael Noonan, Finance Minister made it clear that if GAA clubs pay more than vouched expenses, or pay travel expenses at a higher level than the civil service rate, there are tax implications.
Part-time workers who may be retired, including ground staff and caretakers, who get paid for their work will now have to declare any income they get. Revenue sources said that if a pensioner receives a payment from any employer, it may have tax implications depending on the level of income they receive from other sources. Revenue is also expected to focus on possible benefit in kind implications arising from the practice of making cars available to managers and officials.
Assistance on Tax Issues contact Patrick O Rourke, OKelly Sutton, Kildare Town. www.okellysutton.ie